Friday, November 13, 2015

Haunted Detroit: Ghosts of the Motor City

Flickr - Ray Dumas, Michigan Central Train Station
Rise and Fall of a Civilization

Every haunted location has its own unique story to tell. Detroit was a booming industrial city back in its day, but since automobile production and other industries have gone overseas, the city has slowly fallen into ruins. This has made this location, off the shores of Lake St. Claire, a literal "ghost town." Here the spirits of the past loiter in the streets and in buildings in search of interaction wherever they may find it. When an area this large becomes so little inhabited, it gives free-reign to whatever entities may be living there - both good and bad.

This city is a dynamo for paranormal activity because its natural surroundings foster and fuel spirit energies. To the east is the very large Lake St. Claire and to the south runs the expansive Detroit River. These waterways in and of themselves can generate paranormal energies because they make a great conduit for transmission. If you have ever wondered how water can bolster energy transfer, try this experiment at home:

Before you jump into the shower (a bath does not work as well), turn on your Android or iPhone to a music station you enjoy. I personally am a fan of Pandora, but you can choose Spotify, Soundcloud, or whatever is your beat of choice. Set the volume to the level you want to listen, and then jump in the shower. This experiment works best if you take a hot shower. Lather up, rinse off, and then get out. 

When you pull back the curtain you should notice that the music is louder than when you got into the shower. That is because water acts as a medium to push sound waves along faster than in drier air. The same concept works with paranormal energies. Spirits who wish to communicate in some way with the physical world are in a constant search for the energy and the means to do so. In this search they realize that water can act as an electrical conduit for energy transfer and manifestation. 

Taken a bit further - have you ever had the opportunity to hear a spirit voice speaking directly across the spiritual veil? The voice sounds as if it is passing through water. Hmmm.... 

Legends in the Motor City

Detroit has plenty of water to fuel activity and it also has a rich history peppered with a plethora of legends. In this beautifully documented video below, produced by independent Chicago filmmaker Derek Quint (Addovolt Productions), you will learn about Detroit's past and the multiple spirit hauntings that are scattered all throughout the city. Derek will introduce you to many of the legends tied to the area that serve as the foundation for these hauntings. 




How Does Geology Fit In?


Courtesy infodrilling.com


If we take a look at the Detroit area from a geological perspective, we find that the area sits in a natural basin. This basin was formed from a series glacial movements and sediments that originate from the Great Lakes within its borders and the movement of ice millions of years ago. The rock formations found in the Detroit area, above ground and subsurface, were hydrogeologically formed by a sequence of sedimentary material that was deposited from the ebb and flow of local waters and natural phenomenon. Detroit is located on this map right by the "Dev'n" notation.

The Michigan Basin is typically known for three types of chemical sedimentary rocks - salt, dolomite, and limestone. To better give you an idea of these rock compositions, I thought I would allow geology.com to explain:





"Rock Salt is a chemical sedimentary rock that forms from the evaporation of ocean or saline lake waters. It is also known by the mineral name "halite". It is rarely found at Earth's surface, except in areas of very arid climate. It is often mined for use in the chemical industry or for use as a winter highway treatment. Some halite is processed for use as a seasoning for food. The specimen shown above is about two inches (five centimeters) across."







"Dolomite (also known as "dolostone" and "dolomite rock") is a chemical sedimentary rock that is very similar tolimestone. It is thought to form when limestone or lime mud is modified by magnesium-rich ground water. The specimen shown above is about four inches (ten centimeters) across."









"Limestone is a rock that is composed primarily of calcium carbonate. It can form organically from the accumulation of shell, coral, algal and fecal debris. It can also form chemically from the precipitation of calcium carbonate from lake or ocean water. Limestone is used in many ways. Some of the most common are: production of cement, crushed stone and acid neutralization. The specimen shown above is about two inches (five centimeters) across."






There are huge deposits of both salt and limestone in the Detroit area and the presence of these minerals give rise to fantastic paranormal activity. As I reveal in my book, Limestone and Its Paranormal Properties, (book can be found here) limestone has the ability to record and release electromagnetic and psychic energies because it has the geological ability to do so. It is the scientific method that geologists use to study the Earth's electromagnetic field - recorded thousands, even millions of years ago. Limestone truly can record energies like the Stone Tape Theory suggests. 

There seems to be some very strange supernatural dance that continues to occur in the Motor City area and it hubs around the relationship of water, limestone, and salt. From this paranormal activity spawns the many legends that are tied to the history of Detroit. We do not fully understand how this relationship exists and the extent of its meaning. Working with great people like Derek, we hope to do our part in clearing up any confusion or breaking new ground.

In the next article on Paranormal Insights, I will take a look at a couple of sites in the Motor City (one being the first prison in our country) and expound upon this unusual, yet fascinating supernatural dance. I hope you will join me!!


Works Cited:

http://geology.com/rocks/sedimentary-rocks.shtml

http://info.drillinginfo.com/michigan-basin-geology-oil-and-gas/